comments in java

comments in java

There are many ways to comment in Java, but the most popular one is the use of single-line comments. Single-line comments are used to add comments at a specific line of code, without extending beyond that line.

comments in java

These help programmers and developers understand and maintain code. In this article, we will discuss different types of single-line comments used in Java programming language. They are as follows:

Single-line comments – comments in java

Single-line comments are one-line comments used to make a quick note about a particular line of code, without extending beyond that line.

These are the most common type of comment in programming. Let’s take a look at the example to understand single-line comments in details.

In this example, we have three cout statements. The first two statements are executed when the ‘Hello, World!’ string is printed to the console.

However, the third statement is executed even before the ‘Hello, World!’ string is printed to the console. This is because the third cout statement is commented out, which means that it is not executed.

Double-slash comments

Double-slash comments are used in Java to make a comment that extends across multiple lines. These are very similar to the block comments used in C++ and C, but they are less common in Java.

Let’s take a look at the example to understand double-slash comments in details. In this example, we have a double-slash comment that extends across multiple lines.

As with single-line comments, double-slash comments are ignored by the compiler, so they do not affect the execution of the code.

However, unlike single-line comments, double-slash comments can span multiple physical lines. This can be useful for making really long comments.

Double slash comments are used to comment out larger blocks of code than single-line comments, or code that is spread across multiple lines.

Eclipse how

When working in an integrated development environment (IDE), you’ll notice that the text editor has different colors for various elements. For example, comments are shown in blue, keywords are shown in yellow, and so on.

This color-coding can be helpful when you’re debugging your code, but it can also be distracting. If you want to temporarily turn off this coloring, you can do so by adding a comment to the top of your code file.

You can use whatever comment text you like, or even leave the field blank. To see this in action, create a new Java file and type the following: When you run your code, the IDE will not highlight your code. If you want to see the coloring again, simply remove the comment at the top of your file.

Javadoc comments

Javadoc comments are a special type of documentation that is used by Java’s generated documentation system.

These comments are used to describe the code, and can be included in both the source code and in the Javadoc generated documentation. Let’s take a look at the example to understand Javadoc comments in details.

In this example, we have a public method with a Javadoc comment. We use the @param tag to describe the parameter to the method, and we can also use the @throws tag to describe the possible exceptions that the method could throw.

In the source code, we have a Javadoc comment at the top of the code file. It extends to the end of the line where the /* appears, and it appears before the code. This will be included in the generated documentation.

Doclet how

Doclet is a program that generates documentation from source code comments in a programming language. It uses Javadoc comments to generate documentation, and it parses the source code to find the comments.

Doclet can be used to generate HTML documentation for many different programming languages, including Java. You can use it to create the same documentation that the Java compiler generates, but you can also create your own custom template to generate the documentation differently.

Let’s take a look at the example to understand Doclet comments in details. In this example, we have a public method with a Doclet comment.

The @see tag is used to describe related information, and it can also be used to link to other pieces of code. The @param tag is used to describe the parameters to the method, and the @return tag is used to describe the return value of the method.

Conclusion

That sums up what you need to know about commenting in Java. Remember that comments are meant to be read by humans, so they should be written for people, not for computers.

Comments are a good way to explain your code to other people who might use or modify it, or to yourself when you come back to the code after some time has passed.

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